Norris McLaughlin & Marcus, P.A.

Blogs > Shareholder Disputes in New Jersey

business divorce litigation

Sep 06, 2017

Overcome Your Nagging Doubts About Business Divorce Litigation

You likely came across this article if you Googled the term “shareholder dispute.”  However, it is just as likely that you Googled the term “business divorce.”  One business owner suing the other(s) to be bought out, or some other escape, is often rightly referred to as business divorce because it is analogous to a divorce among spouses in obvious ways.  This posting is about the less obvious ways the two types of legal actions are similar.» Read More

Jul 17, 2017

How To Prepare For Retaliation From Filing Business Divorce Litigation

Many shareholders contemplating getting a “business divorce” have put up with an intolerable situation for years, because they fear that filing a shareholder oppression lawsuit will somehow make matters even worse.  They might be partly correct in the short term.  But the long-term gains often outweigh temporary negatives.

For example, one client had been marginalized and sidelined for years from all important company decisions and all company financial information. » Read More

Jun 29, 2017

It’s Never Too Late to Gain Allies in Business Divorce Litigation

In closely-held businesses in New Jersey with multiple owners, it seems fairly obvious that the more co-owners you can recruit to your side in a business divorce litigation, the better.  You don’t need a lawyer to tell you that.  However, what is not so obvious is the possibility of recruiting co-owners to your side once the litigation has commenced.

Litigation – especially business divorce litigation – can be quite divisive. » Read More

May 27, 2014

We Are Getting a “Business Divorce.” Who Gets “Custody” of the Customers?

Many times, two 50% owners possess different areas of expertise and separate spheres of influence.  For example, it is not uncommon for one business partner to be in charge of sales, with the other in charge of finances.  Because of this, one person often has more contacts than the other.  Presumably, but not necessarily, the shareholder in charge of sales will have more customer contacts than the one who runs the front office.» Read More

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