Blogs > NJ Real Estate Dispute

Breach of Lease Options

Nov 08, 2011

The Importance of Drafting Proper Notices to Quit in a Commercial Tenancy

In an unpublished decision, issued on November 7, 2011, by New Jersey’s Appellate Division, the importance of drafting a notice to quit in accordance with the law is highlighted.  In Sanguiliano v. Walker, 27-2-4205 App. Div., Plaintiff’s summary dispossession action was based on her alleged disorderly conduct and violations of the landlord’s rules and regulations.   » Read More

Nov 02, 2011

How A Letter of Credit Can Facilitate Commercial Lease Deals

A Letter of Credit (“LOC”) is simply an agreement from a bank guaranteeing that Party A’s payment to Party B will be received on time and for the correct amount.  LOC’s are used primarily in sizeable international trade transactions, i.e., a supplier in one country and a customer in another.   » Read More

Oct 20, 2011

The Landlord’s Liens

I previously wrote in this blog about the distraint process available to commercial landlords in New Jersey – a sometimes cumbersome process the purpose of which is to put into the landlord’s pocket at least some of the back rent due from a defaulting tenant (see The Distress of Distraint). » Read More

Feb 07, 2011

What Is a Notice to Quit?

Commercial landlords are occasionally confronted with a situation where one of their tenants is not abiding by the lease. Some commercial landlords feel that they can simply lock the tenant out of its space as result of any breach under the lease. » Read More

Sep 24, 2010

Disposing of a Defaulted Tenant’s Personal Property Redux

I blogged in an earlier post about the importance of including a well-drafted provision in commercial leases giving the landlord the right to remove, and dispose of, the tenant’s personal property left behind after an eviction. 

Including a well-drafted provision in your commercial lease regarding the disposition of the tenant’s property will protect you not only from an angry tenant, but from other parties who may appear on the horizon. » Read More

Jun 22, 2010

The Distress of Distraint

In the previous blog entry, I highlighted the need for commercial landlords to specify in their leases the manner in which the tenant’s personal property is dealt with upon termination of the lease, either by its terms or by way of court action (summary dispossess).  » Read More

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